Aug

25

 One key finding is that some foreign car companies demand the local manufacturing facilities and dealerships to only source parts through the brand company. Through this scheme, the investigation said, those companies managed to achieve abnormally high profits.

Well, cars have been very expensive in China, many with 2-3 times the prices in the US. For many years, I have been puzzled by why this is the case and who actually take the money. Undeniably, various taxes in China are very high, but those do not suffice for the huge price differences.

Now this finding seems reasonable to explain the mystery.

The question is how they could be doing this from the beginning?

The absence of a useful legal system is cleanly an answer. But there are more hidden issues people often choose to ignore.

1. The state regulations provide foreign car companies with basically two choices: a) sell imported cars and pay substantial tariff; or b) set up local manufacturing and sell locally produced cars and pay less tariff. Choice b) obviously is more preferable to foreign car companies for their high-volume models. But the condition for b) is that they have to form local joint ventures with Chinese companies. To any successful foreign car company which is fully capable of designing, providing manufacturing facilities, manufacturing and marketing their own cars, this provision clearly means a brutal cut into their profit. Why would they joint-venture with local idiots who surely have strong political liaisons but know literally nothing about cars? So then limiting parts sourcing became a genius business strategy for them. The argument is very sound: to ensure the best quality of their cars! The local JV partners have little problem accepting it because with however high cost they know they could use their political ties to force higher prices onto the consumers.

2. Cross-border trades have always been extremely restricted in China. In the case of importing cars, only the extremely few with strong liaisons can obtain licenses. And again, the imports carry very high tariff. The rationale for this restriction that has long been planted into people's mind is that it protects national enterprises (implying the meaning that it is good for everyone in the country).

Now lowering prices should be a good thing for consumers. But it comes not without a concern.

If parts selections are not strictly enforced, qualities are certain to suffer. Would elite Chinese consumers trust Chinese products? No chance!


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