Jul

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Mario MendozaA nice bit about baseball and the market from wikipedia:

The *Mendoza Line* is an informal term used in baseball for the threshold of incompetent hitting. Even though Mario Mendoza's lifetime batting average is .215, the Mendoza Line is said to occur at .200, and when a position player's batting average falls below that level, the player is said to be below the Mendoza Line. It is often thought of as the offensive threshold below which a player's presence in Major League Baseball cannot be justified despite his defensive abilities. Pitchers are not held to the Mendoza Line standard, since their specialized work and infrequent batting excuses less competence in hitting.

The term is named for former shortstop Mario Mendoza, a flashy defensive player who struggled at the plate. Although Mendoza's batting average was .215 lifetime, he was known as a sub-.200 hitter whose average frequently fell into the .170 to .180 range during any particular year. That proved to be true in 1979 when Mendoza managed to finish the year with a meager .198 average. Baseball legend George Brettis believed to have coined the term early in that season when asked about his own batting average. Brett is said to have remarked "The first thing I look for in the Sunday papers is who is below the Mendoza line". Bruce Bochte and Tom Paciorek have also been credited as creators of the expression.

One explanation for the expression relates to the historical presentation of numerous batting averages in the Sunday newspapers. Not all batting averages were presented. The theory holds that Mario Mendoza was at the bottom of those that were published and players with lower batting averages did not appear. They were "below the Mendoza line".


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