Jan

26

The CME and the CFTC are doing a great job at destroying the market ecology by exterminating the 'spoofers' out of the futures markets. This clever species helps maintain the equilibrium of order flow by gaming liquidity asymmetries and thus keeping the population of naive momentum front-running strategies in check. It reminds me of the extinction and later reintroduction of the wolves in Yellowstone.

Ed Stewart writes: 

I can't see how spoofers are bad for anyone but the momentum front runners, as you suggest. There must be a "god given" right to jump in front of slower moving participants that we are not aware of. I'd love to know how the spoofing practice developed. My guess is it started as a counter-strategy to neutralize front-running before it became a source of profit?

Vinh Tu writes: 

And "they" destroyed limit orders when they busted the trades during the flash crash. I guess front-running is the only virtuous and god-favoured strategy?

Hernan Avella writes: 

Vinh, I think the case with the limit orders is simply adaptation forced by the hft boys techniques. They have raised everybody's game. What do ppl gain by advertising their intention in the order book?. What it's remarkable, is how long it took for other participants to start randomizing, splitting and using hidden orders in a more widespread fashion.

But to your point, yes, speed is expensive and 'they' try to recover those costs.

anonymous writes: 

Famous energy trader John Arnold says:

"Front-running is profitable against traditional orders entered by humans. But with spoofers in the mix, the picture looks quite different: When the front-running HFT algorithm jumps ahead of a spoof order, the front-runner gets fooled and loses money. The HFT's front-running algorithm can't easily distinguish between legitimate orders and spoofs. Suddenly the front-runner faces real market risk and makes the rational choice to do less front-running. In short, spoofing poses the risk of making front-running unprofitable. Because spoofing is only profitable if front-running exists, allowing both would ensure that neither is widespread."

The basic ideas are very similar to Hernan's market ecology post.


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  1. Jim Davis on January 28, 2015 9:47 pm

    Has the massive decrease in displayed ES liquidity coincided with the anti spoofing rules?

    I see almost ZERO spoofing in equities, if anything , resting large orders are the rule now, and rarely get pulled.

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