Dec

22

Ralph Baer, from Richard Owen

December 22, 2014 |

 "Ralph Baer: the man you never heard of who changed technology forever":

Having fled Nazi Germany with his family in 1938 and been recruited into the US Army in 1943, Baer used his training as a technician for the benefit of military intelligence. As a 23-year-old, he returned from Europe at the dawn of the television age and - when only a few thousand TV sets existed in the US - began a career as a TV engineer.

At the time of this death, Baer had amassed about 150 patents for products including talking books, greeting cards and door mats. He had created famous board games such as SIMON for Milton Bradley, and Laser Command.

Baer said in a US TV interview in 2013 that inventing was what kept him going into old age. "All of my friends have died. What am I going to do? I need a challenge," he said. "I'm basically an artist. I'm no different than a painter who sits there and loves what he does."

"His desire and his genius was always 'What's the next thing?'" his son Mark Baer told The Los Angeles Times.

Baer was working on an electronic doll two weeks before his death, his son said.


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