Dec

15

Is this really true in general?

"The most important thing you need to know about commodities" :

If you have traded stocks for a while, you probably have a sense of when a move has gone far enough to be due for reversal, and you're probably used to seeing longer term positions more or less alternately green and red on the day over any reasonable stretch of time. Be careful, because these (correct) instincts will work against you in commodities, which can trend and trend and trend and end in blowoff moves that go far beyond what anyone expected. Simply put, if you come to commodities from a stock trading background, temper your urge to fade moves…

There was a time in market history when S&P 500 traders (experienced, professional traders) flocked to the soybean pits to daytrade, thinking they could apply their ability from one market to another. That incident ended badly for the S&P traders (but very well for the locals in beans!).

Bill Rafter comments: 

Futures are mean-reverting in the shorter run, and that also applies to equity indices. Much less so with individual equities. That being said, that statement does not apply to squeezes in either. Futures moves tend to be linear, whereas stocks and their indices tend to be parabolic. There are logical reasons for these, but not enough room here to write them.
 


Comments

Name

Email

Website

Speak your mind

Archives

Resources & Links

Search