Dec

12

 Monkeys trained to use a fiat currency make the same mistakes as humans: they are loss-averse.

There are few ways how traders manage loss-aversion: (a) Deleveraging. In other words, everyone has a breaking point and can operate below this "gambling" threshold; (b) Diversification. By spreading a total exposure over wider group of instruments our anchor to individual outcomes is weakened [focusing illusion]; (c) Operational controls to enforce trade exits in case that all the other things fail [Paul Willman's research of traders in the City of London].

But how to design a trading strategy which is built to directly profit from loss-aversion of others?

Leo Jia comments: 

If this means one decides to totally abandon the nature of loss-aversion, then one can go do against all he recognizes as loss-aversion behaviors. This brings a question about its true benefit. If on the other hand, one only wants to take advantage of others' loss-aversion behaviors but maintain his own loss-aversion nature, then what he can do perhaps is limited.

The question is what really counts as loss-aversion.

If what we mean by loss-aversion is losing 1% of assets, then clearly it makes great sense to abandon it. But as one is willing to lose no more than 50% of assets, is he still considered loss-averse? If yes, then how much benefit would he gain by relinquishing this 50% limit?

So if God enforced us a loss limit within which we humans operate, perhaps he gave us a limit that is too small. Is it truly limitless in His mind? Perhaps there is also a limit with Him which just happens to be somewhat larger than ours. This latter may seem reasonable.

anonymous comments:

For those who believe loss aversion is an evolved behavior, it makes sense in the world of extreme scarcity: if you are on the edge of starvation and have a little bit of food, losing all the food could be significantly more detrimental than doubling it is beneficial. This does have some parallels in today's world, as for an average person near retirement age losing all of their savings is significantly more detrimental than doubling them is beneficial.

In terms of the markets, taking advantage of this asymmetry would be something like this, I imagine: let's say the average market participant hates to have their holdings go down by 1% (or any other number) twice as much as they would like them to go up by the same percentage. Let's also say that on the average everybody's holdings have an equal probability to go up and down. If you can figure out how to bet a small enough amount of your capital not to go bust multiple times in such a way as to counteract that tendency than on the average you'll make good winnings. The big question is of course how to bet against this tendency. Should you always bet when others are fearful against their fear regardless of any other evaluations of the situation?

Ed Stewart writes: 

"But how to design a trading strategy which is built to directly profit from loss-aversion of others?"

I think you can open up the concept far more broadly. I see it as the fundamental concept for a near unlimited number of strategies — an idea close to the core of the trading game, regardless of the market.

I told a spec-lister I met with a few weeks ago that the concept (described differently) is 80% of my short-term trading focus — meaning if I don't see it at work I don't trust the idea much at all — to such an extent I've mostly given up on other things. It is very similar to the Bacon cycle idea, but on a specific duration or circumstance (which itself is subject to the larger bacon-cycle effect). Loss-aversion creates urgency, price-insensitivity, and enough order flow to at times scare market makers — all things which open the door to speculative profits.

Consider:

-Times of day that loss aversion is most impactful or loss averse traders are prone to being active
-Price movements that signify loss aversion - quantitative definition
-Events that will trigger loss aversion
-If you know the basic "plays" or trades used by speculators on different time horizons, u look to anticipate who is about to be squeezed. If u define the setup condition (basic play) and a trigger event (of loss aversion) and combine them, you can find interesting ideas both on a discretionary and systematic basis that are highly counter-intuitive to most traders.
 


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