May

5

 This was a very interesting article.

"A chinese mathematician figured out how to beat anyone at rock-paper-scissors":

"The pattern that Zhijian discovered — winners repeating their strategy and losers moving to the next strategy in the sequence — is called a "conditional response" in game theory. The researchers have theorized that the response may be hard-wired into the brain, a question they intend to investigate with further experiments."

Jordan Low writes: 

If I am reading it correct, the losers are basically choosing to display what won recently. Isn't it like using 3Y returns to pick mutual funds? Or did I get it wrong?

Steve Ellison writes: 

I don't play that game, but a good strategy might be to make selections as randomly as possible, for example by memorizing long sequences of digits of irrational numbers (Arthur Benjamin has a memory aid for how to do so).

Bill Walsh, the coach of the San Francisco 49ers football team in the 1980s, scripted the first 25 plays of each game in advance. This strategy made it harder for opponents to guess what play might be coming next. I have an idea that, if I could ever find enough trading systems with positive expectations, it might be good to randomly pick a sequence of systems to use in advance, in order to keep the crocodiles guessing.


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