Dec

11

 Virginia Postrel is the Gary Hoover, nay, the Jack Schaeffer of business writers.

How the 'Car Gal' Rose to the Very Top at GM: Virginia Postrel 

By Virginia Postrel Dec. 10 (Bloomberg) — With its appointment of Mary Barra to succeed Daniel Akerson as chief executive officer, General Motors Co. brings to a half dozen the number of major U.S. corporations headed by women.

[…]

(Virginia Postrel is a Bloomberg View columnist. Her book, "The Power of Glamour," was recently published by Simon & Schuster. Her website is at vpostrel.com. Follow her on Twitter at @vpostrel.)

Kim Zussman writes: 

 It could be fun to come up with a board game (tablet?) to pit (online) flexions against one another.

Attributes would be dealt out at random - since one has little choice over parentage. IQ, Myers-Briggs, political disposition, race, sex, how long mom was in congress, etc, only framed in such a way as to not offend. ie, non-non-non-anglo-caucasion, laterally abled, etc.

Flexionistic attributes would accelerate progress through the business/political/academic world, whereas traits such as ingenuity, thrift, work ethic, sense of fair play, and non-relative morality would slow (nee retard) progress.

The game would consist of competitive progression through prep schools, enrichment programs, Ivy colleges, government internships, Wall street, professorships, and pyramiding net worth. Final score would composite wealth + lifetime political influence + placement of kids + total tryst count.

One problem as a business model would be that those able to afford tablets to play the game might throw them out the window.
 


Comments

Name

Email

Website

Speak your mind

1 Comment so far

  1. Andre Wallin on December 12, 2013 1:36 pm

    Here’s python code for a time series of a random walk of a million coin tosses:

    import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
    import pandas as pd
    import numpy as np
    import randn

    import random
    data=randn(1000000).cumsum()
    plt.plot(data,’k–’,label=’Default’)

    run that a few times and see how technical analysis is at worst a scam and at best a comfort blanket for the inherent uncertainty in life.

Archives

Resources & Links

Search