Nov

11

 I recently spoke with two doctor friends (an independent study with n=2) about their relationship with the government in their medical practice, specifically in Medicare. Both were quite willing to get paid a fraction of the normal cost to treat their medicare patients or not get paid at all. This they could shoulder. One recounted that late in the year, around this time, state medicare funds completely dry up and they get almost nothing in pay from medicare. What they could not abide however, was government oversight/compliance in the name of fraud prevention.

Now that all the easy targets and hucksters in FL have been rounded up, government needs to find other sources of revenue. So they go after legitimate doctors. One received a $300k fine for minor offenses in not checking certain boxes on certain forms. The other was reprimanded and fined for working pro bono on some patients and not others. Apparently he was not qualified to make a determination over who he could treat for free. The government fraud receipts have gone up from a few $100 million several years ago, to over a billion now and is a part of funding ACA. With so much focus on demand (ACA, affordable this or that), very little consideration is given to supply. Incentives for doctors are largely ignored. They predicted fewer hospitals staffed with fewer doctors. On a positive note maybe Walgreens or Rite Aid will fill in the gaps with NP's and there will be a positive certainly unintended consequence.


Comments

Name

Email

Website

Speak your mind

1 Comment so far

  1. chris murphy on November 12, 2013 7:14 pm

    ” Incentives for doctors are largely ignored.”

    The fact that doctors in the US make three or four times what they would make in any other country is incentive enough.

Archives

Resources & Links

Search