Nov

4

 The advice of Art Bisguier comes to mind when considering the Australian's post on turning off the lights. "Schtalll," he always said. "Sit on your hands and write your move down before you move the piece." I always say if you waited a day or two or hour or two on every trade, or definitely to the end of the day on every trade, you'd do much better. We live in a web of deception.

Anatoly Veltman writes: 

With due respect to everyone quoted, I'm not sure. Just like in board games there is time limit, so in any market contract, there is window of opportunity to cease a favorable price. Have recent tests shown that reversals occur between sessions, as opposed to intra-session?

I agree that was the case in yesteryear, because participants who over-leveraged during the day had to liquidate on the close, amplifying the riot. But these days, the pre-set electronic limits prevent such intra-day indiscretion. So it's just as likely to hit major pinnacle or nadir any time in the session.

Craig Mee writes: 

 Wouldn't it make sense to take all the bright lights, and colored up and down arrows, and green and red charts off your screens and replace them with blacks and greys. The flickering of the table creates undue excitement in one's mind and drives one to "play" when they probably should sit. 

Pitt T. Maner III writes: 

Funny, I was just reading something along the same lines but related to gambling. Best not to confuse the exciting red cherries and the appearance of green as being indicative of possible success.

"How Slot Machines Trick Your Brains":

"A reel on a virtual slot machine may seem to be cycling between 22 positions, but the machine powering it could have 64. This means you're seeing those cherries moving by way more than the odds that they will stop. Schull cites a study by Kevin Harrigan, an expert in algorithms, which says that if this type of machine were to pay off according to what people are seeing, players would win 297 percent of the time."


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  1. Orson Terrill on November 6, 2013 12:50 am

    Personal experience says there is definitely truth to what the Chair says. With some algorithms I’ve examined (all?), the more you dial down variables included to provide flexibility, the greater the smallest subset of largest losses matter. So, while waiting that extra couple of days could (would in my case) dramatically reduce the sample space of potential trades, the negative risks from rolling over and doubling down (if that is required) are somewhat attenuated. Of course, drawdowns are exponentially distributed (an oversimplification) and scale up with time… essentially you save yourself one or two days of those more disastrous runs.

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