Oct

31

 This afternoon I was thinking of the events of my honeymoon back in 2009 and while in Hawaii we visited the Sogi residence which featured some good ol' jam band rock-n-roll action by Sogi and his team.

The decay in current music quality versus yesteryear production came long before the decay we have recently seen in the financial services industry. About 30 years or so is my estimate. What is interesting is that classic rock and roll will always have its place — like an old shoe or old pair of jeans. Financial services should be so lucky. What is scary while also quite ironic is that technology is largely the culprit for the decline in both fields.

Jeff Watson writes: 

 Rock and roll is not in decline at all, far from it. Revenues might be down, but not the musical quality. People of a certain age just get stuck in the 60s and 70s and won't let go. But one tends to only taste the cream and forgets that the 60s and 70s brought some absolutely horrible music to the table, stuff (I won't even call it music) performed by Boyce and Hart, Cyrcle, King Harvest, C.W.Mcall, and The Cuff Links. This is the worst song ever written.

My parents thought music died in 1955. My grandparents thought music died in 1920, and on and on. Every generation experiences the same nostalgia for the past, for the music of their youth and feels the new music of the day is declining in quality. Nostalgia is big business because people miss their youth. Bands like the Mowglis, Black Keys, Of Monsters and Men, Daft Punk, Outkast, et al are producing some amazing music which is just as good, or better, than the rock of 40+ years ago. Troubadours like Jack Johnson write and perform music which is just as relevant today as what Bob Dylan wrote two generations ago. An entire new group of people, our kids, are listening to the new rock, and a few old people like myself enjoy it immensely. Stop listening to Clear Channel and find some music……it's out there just waiting to be discovered.

Jim Sogi comments: 

 One day someone asked while I was playing, "Do you know any songs less than 10 years old?" I was kind of stumped, so I've tried to find new songs. It's harder to learn things when you are old and have to beat the new neural pathways harder.

A childhood friend of my son is Ryan Fontana, of Sex Panther. He has achieved big success as a DJ playing electronic dance music. There is some good music there and it's good for dancing. The girls really like it. EDM keeps people dancing and drinking. Some clubs according to WSJ can sell a million dollars of drinks in a night. Some of the music can feel repetitive but when they're dancing, they're not really listening to the music, but feeling it. With the big sound systems, the ground literally shakes. It's an experience and it's good business. I've got an open mind and even like some hip hop stuff, though it's taken a while.


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6 Comments so far

  1. Michael Edelman on October 31, 2013 3:40 pm

    Thanks to Austin City Limits I’ve been discovering some intriguing, original bands that aren’t just whining Indie rockers. Alabama Shakes, The Decemberists, Grizzly Bear, and the Lumineers, to name four I’ve seen recently.

  2. Steve on October 31, 2013 4:31 pm

    The decay in current music quality versus yesteryear production came long before the decay we have recently seen in the financial services industry…What is interesting is that classic rock and roll will always have its place — like an old shoe or old pair of jeans. Financial services should be so lucky”

    But at the very least, rock and roll can survive without borrowing money from the Fed at 0% or all the other sordid chicanery that props up the modern financial services industry.

  3. Ed on October 31, 2013 6:37 pm

    I use to always listen to the old stuff. Now after listening to the better new stuff for awhile, listening to the old stuff is like driving around in a model T after getting acclimated to an Audi R8. Antiquated.

  4. William Brauer on November 1, 2013 1:47 pm

    Music quality started sliding in the late 70’s in my book and the occasional bright spots were often produced by artists from the 60’s. I have wide and varied tastes in rock, blues and jazz and in each genre once the 80’s came in I was out of the audience. We might say just as electronic music ruined the pop world, electronic trading ruined the investment world.

  5. Anonymous on November 1, 2013 11:45 pm

    Rock isn’t dead at all, Country music is the new rock. I would be astonished if you can listen to Eric Church, Jason Aldean, or Luke Bryan, and not feel its southern rock roots.

    Check out
    Eric Church “Springsteen Live in Chatenooga” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gr5XtBJbWTE

    Jason Aldean “Dirt Road Anthem”
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lb9q1ScC4cg

  6. Jeff Watson on November 2, 2013 1:21 pm

    Mr Brauer, you said, ” We might say just as electronic music ruined the pop world, electronic trading ruined the investment world.” Can you prove either of those contentions?

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