Oct

21

 It begins with a new uncertainty, we're going to attack Syria, we're going to default on our debt, a Middle East fight, in conjunction a 1 1/2 % decline or more in stocks or bonds then fighting between the conservatives and the liberals a call by Buffett and Krugman for government intervention and more service revenues. A resolution with a big stock market rise to new 20 day highs an end with blame being put on those who wish lower service revenues and reduced intervention and unanimous agreement that we should never strive for reduced intervention again, and tea party types must go back to caves. How would you improve this or possibly profit from it?

Anatoly Veltman writes: 

But of course crisis starts on the way up. It's been said that no market has ever topped because someone sold massively short at the high. Any decline from the high is merely profit taking, not new shorting. So the beginning of crisis is such overvaluation that's liable to cause aggressive profit taking.

Gary Rogan writes: 

The way to predict the quick resolution of the next crisis is to figure out who is in control of the mechanics. While there was some ambiguity in this one, John Boehner played a truly masterful role in its handling and supposedly (although not by all accounts) received a standing ovation and no blame in the end by most of his tea party opponents, a deliberately induced case of the Stockholm syndrome. Next time he initiates a crisis (and there will be two opportunities early in the new year) bet on a timely resolution, and this time probably a couple of days before the deadline, as in this last one he was almost by his own admission compelled to give his tea party "friends"/antagonists as much rope as was needed to supposedly hang themselves and this will likely not be the case in the future.

Kim Zussman writes: 

Doesn't seem that ambiguous.

When the Organizer and his operatives said to worry the market worried. When the conscientious objectors gave up it went up.

We were re-elected and you will go quietly.


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2 Comments so far

  1. Matthew on October 21, 2013 5:17 pm

    Zerohedge put up a piece linking an interview the WSJ conducted with Mr. Stan Drukenmiller.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-10-20/druckenmiller-blasts-obama-show-me-when-you-initiated-budget-discussions-without-gun

  2. d r dimick on November 3, 2013 2:16 pm

    For Who?

    Perhaps semantics…

    But the presupposition of a market crisis causes one to ask…

    Is it a crisis for the farmer?

    The main street merchant?

    A worker on an assembly line?

    One of the some 20% plus unemployed?

    As the markets — significantly a result of prejudicial rule-making and enforcement favoring flexonic manipulations of market systems and systematic anomalies — have increasing technofied themselves from mainstream social-economic modeling, how much is it a crisis if 2% of a countries population suffers massive (>35%) losses of new worth within days?

    Moreover, how much of a crisis is there if that 2% has jilted 40% plus out of their life saving from the prior two (dot come and real estate) bubbles?

    What is good for the goose…

    dr

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