Aug

15

 I'm just curious: why is the rice market small when the crop is so popular all over Asia and Asia has so much population? Is is because the Asian country make it a priority to be as self-sufficient as they can be even when it's not economical?

Leo Jia writes: 

As a picky rice eater, I think the large varieties of rices segment the rice market. All these rice are not the same at all though they may look very similar. The majority of rice produced in China is a hybrid rice developed by a contemporary Chinese scientist named YUAN Longping. Its mouthfeel is horrible, but it is much cheaper and contributed largely to feeding the large population in the country. Sogi-san commented that rice in Japan costs 4x or more than it does in the US. I am not sure if he referred to the same rice, but to my taste, some Japanese rice are much better than the American one.

There are two rice futures in China, but to my understanding they are both of some small varieties and therefore traded thinly.

Jeff Watson writes: 

Rice is a thin market because the insiders want to keep it that way, and the export market is small compared to other staple grains and grasses. Furthermore, rice tends to be consumed in the country of origin. We export around 3 million metric tonnes if memory serves me correctly, which is about half the US crop.


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