Mar

14

"Super duped" about an old professor who thought he was going to find romance with a beautiful model who he met on the Internet. Instead he carried her suitcase of a white drug. Apparently he confided to her, and what must have been the beautiful reporter that interviewed him, that because of his co-authorship with many who won the Nobel prize, it was a 50% chance that he would win the Nobel also. Anyway, he's in prison now in Buenos Aires. And the prison guards always greet him with "hey Professor, have you won the Nobel yet?

Couldn't realize the resonance of that until I remembered from edspec… the letter my grandfather sent to the football coach. "When you have an all American like Artie Niederhoffer on the team, how could you give the ball to anyone else or let anyone else make the tackle". The coach read the letter in the locker room. And from that time on, my dad had a new nickname. " All American". We met one of the team at Lundi's 20 years later. "Hey, All American, how's it going. Caught any more touchdown passes lately?".


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2 Comments so far

  1. Ed on March 14, 2013 7:37 pm

    That is a vivid memory from the book even though I read it last about 10 years ago. I am sure it struck a nerve with many people as it creates an uneasy quality in the psyche (sympathizing with your father) that many can relate to. Certainly I can.

    For me it was baseball - In this case my dad did part time work for the local paper as the sports reporter - “Ed …… was a one man wrecking crew, hitting a triple to win the game”.

    He was also my assistant soccer (yes, soccer) coach. The league had a rule where all players had to play at least 2 quarters of the game. He used an optimization algorithm (being a mathematician) to maximize the situation - the only constant was that I always played the full game. Ha ha - No one else ever seemed to catch on.

  2. vic on March 18, 2013 2:45 pm

    Hopefully, Mr. Ed you refrained from heading the ball. vic
    but a good memory just the same

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