Sep

2

 One of the great regularities that I have observed from a long and not uneventful career in trading is that whatever governments want, the governments get. If they want stock prices to rise before an election, or oil prices to decrease or commodity prices to decrease they get it. They have so many trillions to work with, so many entities that can be called on to increase the perks and power of the governmental entities. There's the EU, the IMF, the central banks, the what have you. It always amazed me that the palindrome was able to overcome the Old Lady on the pound. All HM Government had to do was tell the private banks to charge 200% interest to the palindrome on the leverage. In those days, presumably the private banks were more independent, but now their very survival, profitability, and existence is dependent on the good will of the governments with the direct investments, the bailouts, the purchase of bad assets, the cost of borrowing reserves, the fines, the regulations that permit their existence unless they agree to further the "Idea". The whole thing must be quantified. And a subset of governmental market reactions must be found that are susceptible to predictions based on specific times, and events. (I think).

Art Cooper comments:

I agree that that is correct, what governments want, governments get, but that's merely the first stage. The second stage is that those groups/powers which have the greatest influence on government get what THEY want from government in those matters which are most important to them — that's who government serves. If Traveler's Insurance wants the repeal of Glass-Steagall so that, post-merger, they can continue all operations in a new Citigroup, then Glass-Steagall will be repealed. Special-purpose legislation seems the primary purpose of contemporary government.

T.K Marks writes:

I've often pondered what you said about the palindrome myself. My only conclusion was that he had to know that his position interests were favorably aligned with enough sovereign interests to pull it off. Or else Greenspan and his monetary brethren the world over would be very wary of the precedence of one private concern successfully staring down a central bank to the point of capitulation. And then basically reveling in the adulation.

Gary Rogan writes: 

And that's an example of "knowing what's going on in the world" and making money from it. He seemingly makes these highly complex "let's reason it out" calculations and bets on them. Not long ago Victor related a story about Palindrome wanting him to bet on something using his reasoning and Victor retorting that he had to do what his numbers were telling him, or something like that.

The few times I listened to him drone on about globalization or how Europe will or will not solve its problems he sounded half-insane, but it evidently still works for him. Of course he now has a lot of influence, so there are self-fulfilling prophecies possibly at work.

 


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