Dec

5

 It is ridiculous for Americans to criticize the failures of other countries to adopt democracy as successfully as we have. Before we got started, we had a century of practice under the benign rule of a distant sovereign during what really was an Age of Reason. Even so, we had a ruinous civil war that continued to be fought for the next century over the issue of whether the 15th Amendment should actually be put into practice.

The Asian democracies — the Republic of Korea, Japan and Taiwan — all took half a century to establish genuine two-party democracies; yet somehow the Russians are to scorned because they have not gotten there in 20 years. When the democracy in South Viet-Nam had its stumbling beginnings, the American reaction was much the same - impatient scorn. It led to the first official murder of a foreign head of state.

As more than one person has noted, the result was a devastation of Southeast Asia that rivals anything Stalin accomplished. Had we had the confidence to leave well enough alone, millions of people would not have died; and John Kerry and many others would live in the obscurity that they surely deserve.

One of the less fortunate aspects of allowing the immigrants and their bright children (vide the Brzezinski family) to do all the talking is that the United States becomes the instrument for the settling of scores that have very little to do with American interests and very much to do with having American power used to settle private scores that go back to the old country.

P.S. If we are going to list the atrocities of the Soviet Empire, we should also include what shocked even the hardened veterans of the Wehrmacht - the Red Army's deliberate wasting of its own soldiers. Max Hastings has a wonderful and awful book out that you should read - his history of WW II - Inferno. In his interview on CSPAN you will find his comments on the fact that even in the last year of the war the Nazis were less brutal towards their own soldiers than were the Soviets - who were winning.


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