Jun

15

 I think this essay is worth reading:

"primitive agricultural communities are `dynamic'. They are subject to continuing change in agricultural technology, induced by population pressure…"

And also this article by Grantham: "We're Heading Toward a Disaster of Biblical Proportions".

Victor Niederhoffer asks Alex Castaldo to explain to him what this is all about.  Alex Castaldo writes: 

The first link is a 108 page essay written in the early 1960s by Ester Boserup , a European agricultural economist I have heard about before but don't really know. At this time many people were concerned that overpopulation was a big problem for the world. In this essay she argues that actually in some cases a surge in population forced people in an area of the world to improve their agricultural technology and make other changes that were beneficial. So (local) population increase was actually a spur to innovation and economic progress.

Jeremy Grantham on the other hand is a contemporary money manager from Boston (born in England) who is always somewhat bearish (except in March 2009 when he briefly and correctly turned bullish). He is very environmentally concerned and always worries that humankind is using too many resources or using them unwisely. Quote: "Grantham [believes] that the world has undergone a permanent "paradigm shift" in which the number of people on planet Earth has finally and permanently outstripped the planet's ability to support us."

So the Boserup thesis and the Grantham thesis contradict each other, and Mr. Depew is quoting Boserup to counter Grantham.

Victor Niederhoffer writes:

Julian Simon would turn in his grave, as would the author of The Improving State of Humanity.

Vincent Andres writes: 

If on the other hand, the most valuable resource is the human brain, a larger population is better.

Steve Ellison writes: 

I would rephrase, "if on the other hand, the most valuable resource is the human independent brain,"(Because globally, what's the use of 1.000.000.000 similar brains ?).

The ratio in the brain distribution between the tails and the body probably matters. And the bigger the body, the bigger its reinforcement, and maybe (?) the bigger the crushing of independant brains.

… hopefully, this line of reasoning is wrong.


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