Oct

27

 This story about the auctioning of the most sought after baseball card in history is something of interest to me. Though my time is better served now elsewhere, it still is worth mentioning. I once had a gentleman breakdown the following to me as places to invest your money:

1. equities

2. fixed income
3. commodities
4. real estate
5. arts and collectibles

Now we all know of the derivatives and options that exist of the above so this list is just for simple purposes. The auctioning and selling of arts and collectibles seem to take place only in bankruptcy or death at estate auction? The Nun inheritance of this card is baffling on many levels. The brother of the Nun who died knew what he had, kept it, just didn't get to sell it. I would like to know the cost of purchase for the card from the brother to use the auction price to determine percentage appreciation. I'll assume zero though.

I know the sports card market very well and have met with the best of the traders in this market and talked with "hedge fund-like" partnerships. It is amazing that this is kept on the low down as much as it is until only a prized jewel emerges?

It is in my opinion that on that day in November don't be surprised if an anonymous buyer gets the winning bid and that this buyer will probably represent the greatest hockey player to play in the NHL. He's done this trade before!

I need to pay more attention to Mr. NHL, I sit on a pile of Canceco's, Bond's, and others that reality depreciated recently! I'm a small tiny ghost walkin' around Trinity in the sports card world.


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