Oct

24

Much of what medical researchers conclude in their studies is misleading, exaggerated, or flat-out wrong. So why are doctors– to a striking extent– still drawing upon misinformation in their everyday practice? Dr. John Ioannidis has spent his career challenging his peers by exposing their bad science.

From the article "Lies, Damned Lies, and Medical Science" in the Atlantic.

Craig Mee writes:

Thanks Bill, outstanding read. Everyone should read that including the whole family. It does most reality tv shows and glossy mags out of a job….that's how enjoyable it is. Test and retest, especially the original basic findings seems to be one of the main messages (which dailyspec emphasises often)…and everyone has got their own agenda mixed up in everything all the time.

Replacing quants and traders for reasearchers and physicians in this passage brings some interesting thoughts, and for the passage: "there's simply too much complexity in patient treatment", think individual markets.

"Researchers and physicians often don't understand each other; they speak different languages," he says. Knowing that some of his researchers are spending more than half their time seeing patients makes him feel the team is better positioned to bridge that gap; their experience informs the team's research with firsthand knowledge, and helps the team shape its papers in a way more likely to hit home with physicians. It's not that he envisions doctors making all their decisions based solely on solid evidence—there's simply too much complexity in patient treatment to pin down every situation with a great study. "Doctors need to rely on instinct and judgment to make choices," he says. "But these choices should be as informed as possible by the evidence. And if the evidence isn't good, doctors should know that, too. And so should patients." 

Victor Niederhoffer comments:  

I have always said that aside from the licensing of Drs. , the insistence on double blind studies needed for approval is one of the greatest reducers of life expectancy, and of course, maintainers of anti competitiveness, and of course, improper use of statistics in the real world aside from our own field.


Comments

Name

Email

Website

Speak your mind

Archives

Resources & Links

Search