Sep

8

 Hi V,

Here is submission for Whisperer Contest.

Thank you.

dr

The Beholder, Neither Beauty nor Beast

Jackson Hole is named after Davey Jackson (1788-1873), a mountain man who trapped the area for beaver.

Having helped my father trap woodchucks at our farm as well as coming across trappers and traps during deer hunting in Maine, the chair's contest (with its market analogies so implied) is not without circumstantial if not direct correlation(s). A trap itself may be considered analogous to "boxed" (or closed loop) quantification that defines points of convergence and divergence. Moreover, animal tracks are not unlike price action footprints relative to time intervals and price patterning.

In the linked article, the hole of Jackson Hole is aptly named by those mountain men who had to descend into that valley from the North and East along steep slopes as if entering a hole. Again, relative to points of consolidation or tiers for positioning or hedging, such lows symbolize graphical referencing, wherein rivers and streams provide habitat for life generating trends and channels.

Aside: Fed Chair B.B. is listed a visitor of Jackson. After his family moved to Dillon, South Carolina, he waited on tables at "South of The Boarder" before college. During seasonal migration to and fro Maine and the Palm Beaches, this oddity was a favorite overnight of mine with dad.

The dilemma, I surmise, though, with our suggesting the best use of whispering is one of perceived symbiosis in language and environment: to wit…A horse whisperer is a horse trainer who adopts a sympathetic view of the motives, needs, and desires of the horse, based on natural horsemanship and modern equine psychology. Growing up with horses among other farm animals and having dabbed at training here and there, I came to model my understanding on the work of Monty Roberts. He and his wife Pat (my mom was also named Pat and maiden name, as my middle name, is Roberts) have adopted 47 children in addition to their own 3 kids. You may see his work here. Registered as his term for "hooking on", the phrase "Join~Up", in which a trainer negotiates with an untamed horse to form a voluntary relationship. This approach is contra-indicative to industry traditions of 'breaking" a horse, whereby physical subdual is achieved by often violent confrontation or interaction.The point here being is that a horse whisperer helps horses with people problems – sometimes, as a result, helping people with themselves. One so connects to understand with an object oriented approach, such as to help a rider and mount join-up, as portrayed in Redford's movie

Accordingly, be it with horses or markets, one, as a whisperer with a function as so implied by Victor, must first understand that language being transmitted. This factor is elemental for issue identification and definition if not quantification. Is there such a language of the markets? For instance, when a younger horse lowers his or her head to the older mare of the herd, it may be a sign of contrition or submission. Licking of the lips may be a sign of nervousness, fear, or seeking forgiveness. Are there similar signs generally analogous so occurring within price action?

Then there are the environmental distinctions. A horse is a living thing, natural, not artificial as a human construct. Markets are artificial; the one common singularity of such may be that each operates as an electronic exchange. However, the Theory of Quantitative Relativity indicates that the energy of such systematics is neither invariant (contra a horse's need to eat) nor of a singularity (contra a horse's time of birth or death). Therefore, where do we find a comparable numeric hierarchy in horse parlance relativity to market action?If you are asking yourself whether I penned this prior query in all seriousness or was attempting instead to be funny, well… yes and yes. When keying out the question, I was serious. Upon punctuation of the sentence, the analogy seemed humorous.

Nevertheless, the contest challenge is to identify the best use of such listeners of markets. Given that markets lack both a uniform language (albeit money) and decentralized, often fractured environments, whispers here appear to be more of use to consoling or commiserating with the rider (or trader, investor, speculator, etc.) than training (or taming) the beast.

An esoteric query? Perhaps but one which those so concerned or who monitor such cocktail banter might consider to be weighty. Even if de minimis, though, it makes for worthy digression.

P.S G and V: you ain't gonna break them horses who'd done left the barn a la post repeal of Glass-Steagall unless we restring that ole fence line.


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