Sep

4

Churchill and wife ClementineI saw this written about Churchill:

When Churchill entered the inner Cabinet as First Lord in 1911, Britain was first nation on earth and ruler of the greatest empire since Rome. When he left in 1945, Britain was an island dependency of the United States:

"..he schemed constantly behind closed doors agitating for war at every opportunity.

"He was also a first rank opportunist. Supported nationalizing industries when he thought he might be able to run them. switched to Hayek when out-socialized on the left.

"Switched political parties numerous times.

"Lots of bravado about being tough when losing his empire and sending boys to their deaths, if that is an admirable trait.

"There wouldn't have been Nazi's in the first place if not for his (and others) role in Versailles. He lived for war. wanted war at every turn, and it cost Britain her empire."

Can Mr. Jovanovich give his opinion?

Stefan Jovanovich obliges: 

Churchill's disastrous military mistakes as CIC– Gallipoli, Narvik, even Singapore– all had the same source: he was determined to avoid any repetitions of the "meat-grinder" of the Somme. Churchill's fascination with "wonder weapons" and "special executive" missions came from his hope that these alternatives to conventional warfare could offer an escape from the unavoidable truth about wars fought between opponents who will not cut and run.

The European continent has had a history of warfare that is unmatched by any place else on the globe. That is– in the end– probably the best explanation for how some soggy islands, river deltas, and dry mesas produced world empires; the inhabitants were constantly tinkering to build better weaponry.

To take that tradition of strife and then say, "Oh, an unfair (sic) peace treaty and a bad choice for gold-sterling exchange rates is the explanation for Hitler, Stalin and Mussolini" seems to me more than a bit of a stretch. If you are going to blame peace treaties for the continuation of the Western Way of War, you have to look to the treaties of the 1870s.

Treaty of Frankfurt

Treaty of Berlin


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