Jun

11

 Nobody asked me but the Lakers look very similar to the Knicks to me in their helter skelter approach to getting baskets with the only exception that they have a very good star in Kobe who can fake many ways. There is no rhyme or reason to their play, and when they score a basket it's a fluke three by Kobe or a lucky rebound by Gasol.

Boston on the other hand has a raison d'etre and reminds me of the teams that play the Knicks that always pull away during the fourth quarter.

You can almost see the tug of war between the two teams, like the fight between the bulls and the bears near the end of the day, as the flexions attempt to liquidate the weaks before reversing the next quarter.

Alan Corwin writes:

As a Celtic fan since before the days of Bill Russell, I concur with your analysis and hope it holds up. The Lakers have lots of talent, but it doesn't mesh a lot of the time. The Celts go through frightening stretches where they can't put the ball in the hoop, but they are almost always getting good opportunities.

Red on Roundball is still worth watching. You don't even have to be a basketball fan to appreciate the way his mind attacked the game.

The difference between Nate in Boston and Nate in New York is that Doc Rivers know when to take him out (i.e., most of the time).

Pitt T. Maner adds:

The 5th game should be big–winner would have an advantage.

There is the interesting dynamic of finesse/skill (Kobe) vs. power/inside game (Big Baby Davis).  Actually Davis is quite skillful and almost ballerina-like in those not so easy reverse layups–he shows tremendous heart and desire and considerable improvement over his LSU days (where he was darn good).

Comments this morning were about how can a true 6' 6" guy like Davis go in amongst trees like Odom 6' 10"ish and Gasol (7 footer) and be effective since they know from scouting that you have to overplay Davis to one side.   Answer was  quickness, positioning and "he has a big tuchus"–ha, but its true.  The more space (base) you occupy laterally with mainly muscle the bigger you can play against length.  And he has some of the same cat-like quickness of Barkley.

The Lakers had a chance last night if they make those technical free throw shots and if the referees change the call that went against Kobe when he took an apparent charge.  So it was a bit risky to keep the Celtic 2nd team in there late into the 4th quarter, although they played very well.  Riskier than it looked.  7 or 8 point lead in the NBA is like 3 to 4 for mere mortals.

I suspect that Phil Jackson hasn't shown the Lakers complete hand yet and has some ideas for each game number–situational strategies for game 5, 6 and 7.

With respect to Kobe his fade-a-way shots and 3 pointers look lucky but he is better shooter than one might think–if he goes on a streak watch out.  Hot hand type.

Not quite Bird vs. Magic but its still a very entertaining NBA championship series.  A Game 7 would be great.


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2 Comments so far

  1. michael Bonderer on June 11, 2010 10:47 am

    things are different at Staples.

  2. steve on June 12, 2010 9:15 pm

    Personally, I dont know how you compare the Knicks to anything resembling a professional sports franchise. They are probably one of the worst run organizations in sports and almost certainly the worst run basketball organization. But that is an argument for another time.

    What is interesting to note is that in most sports but particularly in basketball baskets are normally scored in runs. A team may play even with its opponent for most of the game but in a small segment of time either wins or loses the game based on a few well executed plays. Study the scoring by quarters sometime and you will see what I mean. Thus the players but especially the coaching staff must be intensely aware of mood shifts or momentum shifts and be ready to capitalize upon them. In playoffs those shifts are violent and fleeting due to the intensity level. . This is where the coach does the majority of his work. Calling time outs matching players to the event, and a full host of other variables.

    Extrapolate this to the stock market. Each day, a market has its own mood, a tenor a particular temperature and intensity. To capitallize and maximize profits one must learn to identify the warning signs and nuances in order to increase the likelihood of success.

    More to follow.

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