May

25

Gorgeous GussieNote the Bituminous indicator is positive if Federer beats Nadal in the Finals.

Upon seeing the risque pictures of Miss V William's first match Ted Tinling came to mind. Tinling and Gussie Moran started something back in 1949 ("bringing vulgarity and sin into tennis" by some accounts). Shorter skirts obviously launched the market for the next 17 years. Times were quite different back then when things were "proper" and members could be banned from the clubhouse for code violations:

Moran entered several amateur tennis tourneys in California, eventually rising to eligibility to play at Wimbledonin 1949. Preparing for that appearance, she asked the official Wimbledon host, Ted Tinlingto design her outfit. She asked for one sleeve to be one color, the other sleeve to be another color, and the skirt to be a third color. Due to the tournament rule that all outfits had to be white only, he declined, but later agreed to design an outfit that complied with the rule.[1] Her outfit, a short tennis dress with ruffled, lace-trimmed knickers, was short enough for her knickers to be visible during the match, a first for any tournament.[4]

Her outfit drew considerable attention; reporters covering the event began calling her "Gorgeous Gussie"[4], and photographers fought for positions where they could get low shots of Moran,[4] with the hope of glimpsing the lace.[1]. The event scandalized Wimbledon officials,[5] prompting a debate in Parliament.[1] Moran, who was accused of bringing 'vulgarity and sin into tennis' by the committee of the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club[1], later reverted to wearing shorts.[2] Tinling, who had acted as official Wimbledon host for 23 years, was banned for the 33 years following the incident (he was invited back to Wimbledon in 1982).

Today the indicator is fashion color:

The antithesis of recession-appropriate sackcloth and ashes, prints exert a strong emotional pull. "They represent the mind-set of the consumer," said Kit Yarrow, a consumer psychologist at Golden Gate University in San Francisco. "They express a budding feeling that's more optimistic and refreshed."


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