May

26

pez dispenser dispensing viagraHere are some poignant things to reflect upon about yesterday, May 21, I think:

0. The low of the day was below the low on the Flash Crash day.

1. A Millstein occurred, was it bullish or bearish and as of when.

2. The set up at the beginning of the day was highly similar the previous day. How best to define similarly without a neural net.

3. The low was not quite equal to the low of the year on Feb 7.

4. The interactions with bonds and oil and copper and the dollar was predictive.

5. It followed a series of disastrous Thursdays, with double digit S&P declines.

6. The sponsor said he wouldn't buy stocks.

7. A promoter said he sees S&P below 950 in fib retracement. Another sage from a broker's house saw stocks rallying. Presumably their disseminated views caused spikes at the time of announcement. Was there anything predictive in comparing the reaction.

8. The S&P pit opening followed the biggest decline in a year.

9. The fixed income prices opened at an all time high, and closed at an all time high but managed to drop a percentage regardless.

10. The flash rise occurred with 20 minutes to go from a 1.5 percentage drop in afternoon after a vastly different experience in prior days.

11. The courage to not be dissuaded out of your position from the other broker, or the inner survival man, or your assistant who always wants to take profits as of Friday 3:40pm would have been redoubtable.

12. Mr. Vix and Mr. Vic opened at one year highs and followed a similar trajectory to the fixed income.

13. A 10 percent correction occurred; is it bullish or bearish or random. Same for breaks of the long moving averages.

14. To what extent did May options expiration have a predictive effect.

15. Were the movements in the Euro and Asian markets overnight a pilot fish?

16. Was revulsion from the increases in "sharings" and "service" scheduled for the beginning of 2011 a factor?

17.  What political factors relating to the approval of bailouts by houses in Europe and reforms in the US played a part?

18. How do predicted earnings increases factor into the Fed Model and should the Shillerian 10 year p/e calculation be obfuscated with the man.

19. It was the biggest decline in a week in the year.

20. There had been a run of multiple intervals of declines in a row.

21. How did all this affect and react to the moves in individual stocks?

Inquiring robots within and without the mind wish to know the answer to such questions on a scientific and or useful basis for future input. What approaches and other more poignant queries should be proffered or gainsaid?

and…

22. The sage likes to compare the stimulus bill to taking 1/2 a tablet of Viagra and then diluting it with candy. We need more he said.

What are the natural reflections engendered by such an utterance?

I'll give a prize at the annual spec party for the best such reflection.

Pitt T. Maner comments:

Bob Dole petting a dog on the headThe potential stimulative effects of lower oil prices come to mind. There are more scholarly sources to be found, but here is a snippet of thought.

"Every $1 per barrel drop in oil's price increases U.S. GDP by $100 billion per year and every 1 cent decrease in gasoline's price increases U.S. consumer disposable income by about $600 million per year."

Lower oil prices like Viagra would seem to be useful for the longer term mechanism of action effects but its the lowering of obesity (and sugar consumption) and belt-tightening of runaway spending that may be more important in the long run.

An image of Bob Dole petting his dog on the head comes to mind. 

Martin Lindkvist writes:

The sage seems to know a lot about the right dose of……candy. Some questions remain to be answered though. When he said "we need more", was he referring to the stimulus bill or the stimulus pill? And who are we? Should the market mistress be jealous? 

Sushil Kedia adds:

The mythical character James Taggart in Atlas Shrugged would have said so had Viagra been available in that age. Might I extend the tautomerization such that the James Taggarts hidden all over "in the system" are as sagacious as the sage or perhaps the other way round that the sagacity of the sage is a Taggartian mumble.

He never believed that anyone should be paying taxes. At least that's what he positioned to imply by never giving out dividends. He could have little regard for those who indeed tax their finances and their bodies to experience the pleasures of achievement and the achievement of pleasure, respectively.

Give me more! This ain't enough!!

Jack Tierney comments:

"Our first stimulus bill, it seemed to me, was sort of like taking half a tablet of Viagra and having also a bunch of candy mixed in as everybody was putting it into their own constituencies. It doesn't have quite the wallop." - Warren Buffett

A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down
In this instance, Mr. Buffett is borrowing from the equally iconic Mr. Disney and his tune "A Spoonful of Sugar Helps the Medicine Go Down." However, since so many different and divergent candies were necessary to satisfy the various "constituencies," few were pleased with the aftertaste. Mr. Buffett has suggested a second dose and "taking it straight" since July of '09. Unfortunately, inherent in his initial support and subsequent carping is the unavoidable insistence that there exists a stimulus package, which properly configured, will work. This is unfortunate because it foretells that something, something equally stupid, will be done.

The suggestion (whether sugar coated or not) is flawed on two counts (at least). First, the same "smartest guys in the room" who created the disease and subsequent medicine are once again heading up the project. Secondly, the historical record contains numerous examples of "stimulus programs" which have two things in common: they have been designed and promoted by the very brightest and they have all failed.

Further, if we are to adhere to our commonly held characterization of the market as The Mistress, then Mr. Buffett's Viagra suggestion is obviously misdirected. Although the recommended medication might do wonders for the stimulators, the only important response is hers (and I'm sure that I'm not alone in observing that on occasions, rare occasions, our enthusiasm just isn't enough).

At some times (perhaps at all times) we must let the Mistress work it out on her own. If TV ads and infomercials are to be believed, modern self-applicable developments have added to the numerous nostrums, aids, and approaches already available. Checking the historical record once again, we find that her response times can be capricious. But she alone determines the timing; the addition or withholding of a spoonful of sugar won't speed things along.

Steve Ellison comments:

"The set up at the beginning of the day was highly similar the previous day. How best to define similarly without a neural net."

A simple calculation of open relative to the previous close would have shown the similarity of Thursday and Friday. For example: "a 10 percent correction occured, is it bullish or bearish.or random. same for breaks of the long moving averages."Dr. Zussman showed last July that several moving averages from 40 to 70 weeks had good predictive value, so I would interpret the break of the 40-week average as bearish.


"the sponsor said he wouldnt buy stocks."

So what? He's a bond guy.

"What approaches and other more poignant queries should be proffered or gainsaid?
"

At the beginning of May, I posted the performances of 13 asset classes in a horse racing format. I suspect that some important "forms" in the markets last about two months. That is why I showed two-month performances and chose to post them at the beginning of a new two-month period. The S&P 500 had the second best return of the 13 asset classes in March and April. Furthermore, the form in March and April was a slow and steady upward trend. The public would be looking for more of the same in May and June, so something very different was guaranteed to happen.


Comments

Name

Email

Website

Speak your mind

3 Comments so far

  1. Gary Rogan on May 23, 2010 1:28 am

    What’s the difference between the sage and Krugman? Other than than the $60 billion, it pretty much comes down to the ukulele skills.

  2. david on May 23, 2010 4:43 pm

    you forgot to mention the expert guest of the network last week, who told the viewers that the pattern of the market was heavy selling into the weekend and heavy buy the beginning of the week. well it was total opposite this week. RISK, not sure whats worse, CNBC or the market itself but I know I”m going to re-read “The Nature of Risk” by Mamis…….have a blast at the gathering!, & best to all.

  3. Ken Drees on May 24, 2010 11:39 am

    you should enjoy that book. trying, not winning, is freeing!

Archives

Resources & Links

Search