Mar

29

 1. There is probably not one person in the financial community who does not look upon the enhanced level of intertwining of the government and Wall Street as unprecedented and mind boggling. To gain perspective on such things as the pointing of guilty fingers at one party or the other, attempts to deflect attention by claiming that an innocent party should b e pilloried, or most flagrantly the holding out of the sorrows that would ensue if one were not given alms and handouts, I have turned to Aesop for guidance and happiness. In particular I find the story of the two beggars that wished to share in the good but not the bad, the stork and the lion whose reward was not be eaten, and the many fables about troikas where the blame was cast on an innocent animal to be.

One guesses that the wagoner firing, and the AIG bonus rage is closest to the Aesop fable the wolf and the lamb. The lamb took refuge in the temple. The wolf said, do come out because the priest is sure to sacrifice you on the alter. But the lamb said, " better to take the chances here than be eaten by you."

2. In reading The Aeneid one comes upon the beautiful passage: "He falls, unhappy, by a wound intended for another, looks up to the skies and dying remembers sweet Argos" with reference to a spear thrown at Aeneas by Mezentius that glanced off Aeneas's shield and hit Anther. How often has a political decree, an economic announcement, of a ephemeral nature or one designed for another purposes, perhaps to garner votes, or grease the wheels of commerce been glanced off and hit the trader with such results, and does he dream of sweet Argos in such situations.


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