Jul

3

A MurrayAndy Murray's centre court, 'Rocky' style comeback against Gasquet has given the audience something to remember for a long, long time. It was the finest piece of tennis from a British player in years. Only a couple of years ago, I remember Murray's game being absolutely horrible to watch. Because he doesn't try to hide his emotions one bit, you could read Murray's face and demeanour and pinpoint the exact pivotal moment in the game when he would break down and effectively lose the game. The story would usually involve a good start, the opponent outperforming Murray on a series of shots, Murray getting frustrated, Murray complaining on all the contentious shots as if the world was against him, and finally Murray losing. He had no mental maturity.

What really struck me in Murray's game against Gasquet was not just that he came back from two sets down to win, but that even when Murray was firmly against the ropes, he kept his composure firmly in check and played with a winner's confidence even though he was losing. This is a quality I adore. In tennis, golf, and other such games, the mental part of the game is a crucial part of the winning puzzle. I imagine some traders will succeed with little confidence, simply because the role of luck is arguably a lot higher in trading than in many sports. However, on balance, I believe a confident attitude of the sort seen in sportsmen competing at their best but from a losing position is a valuable and honourable trait, well worth trying to develop in onself.

Murray is up against Nadal tomorrow, which is a lucky career move. Since Andy Murray is probably the only person who thinks he can beat Nadal, this means that if Murray loses to Rafa, there should be no collective sigh from the British public of the sort we used to get when Tim Henman used to lose to potentially conquerable opponents.


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