Mar

4

I am currently reading "Get Everything Done and Still Have Time to Play" by English life coach Mark Forster.

He has some interesting and original ideas. For example he prefers the use of must-do lists over to-do lists, and gives an exercise to develop the necessary will power.

He says time management is really attention management, and that we have a limited amount. It is impossible to give more than 50% of one's attention to more than one thing — though many try — and balance is to be achieved by delegation or reducing the number of objectives.

He provides a critique of popular methods using a fable of a princess and a luckless suitor who has inherited a business, who tries each system in turn and finally seeks solace in the pub.

Notably, and this is a good example of his original approach, he does not believe in prioritization (except in crises) and points out that there is some sense in choosing low priority tasks to action, so that they are dealt with long before they become a potential crisis.

In summary, he writes about quality of action and strength of resolve, and is not formulaic.

Russ Herrold adds:

A long time ago, when I was drowning in paper, I found Stephanie Winston's TRAF|S system on a couple of pages of her book "The Organized Executive" (Norton, 1983) and have been using it, and teaching it when consulting, ever since.  As it has been passed by with later writings by her (not so concise, not so focused), I see that Amazon has it for a penny used.

I do a five minute presentation (a bit of 'acting') with sight, sound, and humor to give and set the lesson on its use. I do this with others who are drowning in issues who seek my help, to give us a common vocabulary and problem solving rubric. The beauty of this little system is that one never touches an issue more than three times before resolving it. Nothing gets lost.


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