Dec

11

Handles
The bond move the last three days is down three full handles from 117 3/4 to 114 3/4. That's the greatest three day move down before a FOMC meeting in history, I believe (my data cover only the last 94 FOMC meetings from 1996). The closest contender was March 17, 2003 where a decline of 2 3/4 occurred. The bond market must not like price controls.

Anatoly Veltman writes:

Both the up-swing (to 12/4 118′22 high) and the down-swing (to 12/10 114′12 low) were on reduced Open Interest, allowing me to play reversals with greater impunity. O.I. tipped covering: it meant that fewer stop-loss orders have remained resting; a factor that substantially cushioned risk for the near-term value-picker. More interesting, both reversal trades were obvious to me in real-time; and the slight O.I. data lag was not hindrance.

The top was a double-top in price of the 10-year (and a secondary top in all Treasuries, from 2-30year); while O.I. displayed Bearish Divergence.

The ensuing chart decline was symmetrical to November's chart rally (the chart “symmetry play” piqued Victor’s interest on 12/4), and pointed to low-volume, thin chart space all the way down into the 114 handle. At the minute 114′12 traded, for 10 consecutive futures sessions O.I. cumulatively slid over 100,000 lots (10% of the exchange total)!

So, .25 on Fed Funds and .50 at the discount window — or any other combination, plus “all-important” Paragraph Three FOMC mumbling — the trade here is technically solid. My analysis is performed discretionarily in real-time; I suspect 21-century black boxes execute these trades quite ahead of me, unfortunately!

Carlos Nikros adds:

I suspect that lots of fixed income securities just became substantially longer in duration last week, as well, necessitating the usual hedging and pruning.

Andrea Ravano observes:

I think the fear factor that pushed bond prices to their limit is fading. If we consider yield moves instead of prices we get the following picture :

Mat./1week ago/Yesterday/Difference

2 Yr. 2.87 3.20 +0.33

5 Yr. 3.28 3.60 +0.32

10Yr 3.93 4.18 +0.25

The data along with the collapsing spread between Tips and vanilla Treasuries points to a "normalisation" of the bond market to pre-subprime panic levels.Which, of course, does not mean one should not be worrying about inflation in the long run, but short term wise, the move in bonds might be explained with year end book squaring and the end of the worst in the sell off of the stock autumn bear market move.

Alan Millhone remarks:

I wonder how many other UBS types will fall victim to the subprime debacle before the dust finally settles? May be a long and cold winter for builders/investors/developers. Investors look to the Feds to step in to stabilize. Fed intervention to me looks like a form of price controls, much like price freezes and rationing in the Second World War.

Victor Niederhoffer offers a postscript:

One can now see what the purpose of the four point drop in bonds in the previous three days before the Open Market meeting was: to vigilantly control the Governors from overly inflationary activities.

SP

Barry Gitarts adds:

The equity sell-off today at 2:15 was almost expected to happen as it did when the Fed cut rates last time. What's unexpected was that the market kept going down and did not stage a turnaround at 2:30 - 3:00 pm. Maybe it became too obvious and the daytraders with their one hole located at 4:00 pm got cornered. Maybe the market will resume its upward course tomorrow after feeding the big fish today.


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2 Comments so far

  1. Craig Bowles on December 11, 2007 10:44 am

    The short-term growth rate is rebounding after moving below previous lows since the last recession. Everyone has been so focused on employment and now the Fed that Friday’s CPI expectations of +0.6% is hardly mentioned. Germany is the first to report CPI each month and factoring in the seasonal adjustment used last year gave +0.8%. Japan increased. Italy increased. Today, China increased. Previously, someone mentioned on this site that their wife calculated her inflation at around 11% which is the same as the 1980 method of computing the current CPI. Leading inflation indicators rebounded pretty strongly in November, as well.

  2. hahahah on December 11, 2007 5:47 pm

    Nice calls dudes

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