Sep

7

Intelligence, from Steve Ellison

September 7, 2007 |

There are many types of intelligence. A short list would start with academic, creative, and practical intelligence. Academic intelligence is the easiest to measure and hence is over-emphasized. Similarly, the readily available American football statistics of yards gained and touchdowns scored provide no way to evaluate the linemen who never carry the ball, but are critical to team performance. My observation is that practical intelligence is a larger determinant of success than academic intelligence.

Larry Williams remarks:

I failed lots of classes — I was a goof-off and did not care one twit about most classes. I snuck into college on a football scholarship. Never had any idea I'd end up as a trader — I was an art student. Then I found my great intellectual love, and my life changed. But at 13, 15 18, 20 I was a was a wandering generality — just like most kids.

Shui Kage adds:

My first attempt at a British A level:

Maths... Grade F (fail)
Chemistry... Grade F (fail)
Physics... Grade U (unclassified)
Biology... Grade U (unclassified)

On my second attempt I managed to enter the University, with honours in Chemistry as a bonus. I know I am not intelligent, I just worked hard. Kids should never be deprived by a one-time exam result alone. In fact, besides academic exams there are more important traits kids must learn at schools: common sense, manners, honesty, integrity, social skills. Jeff Skilling was a Harvard grad. He might be intelligent but totally lacks integrity.

I did not learn as much at University as when I was at a poor local state school where I saw the reflection of society: single parents, the physically disabled, the talented, the poor, the affluent, gangs, the terminally ill. I learned how to respect others and get along with all.


Comments

Name

Email

Website

Speak your mind

Archives

Resources & Links

Search