Aug

28

Washington Suburbs Lure Federal Work to Top New York's Wealth

Forget those swanky Connecticut addresses, lakeside Chicago suburbs and Silicon Valley millionaire enclaves. Loudoun and the next two wealthiest U.S. counties lie just outside Washington — the traditional home of government workers — and have median household incomes rising to almost $100,000, the latest Census Bureau figures show.

I have stated on the radio for years that if the taxpayers had any idea how disconnected government pay had become from the private sector pay, they would burn down Washington. It is not uncommon for two government workers to marry, each with a bachelors degree, and each attain a $100,000+ salary inside of five years and live in a million dollar home in the DC burbs. I live here and can tell you it is truly surreal.

During the housing crunch of the 1930s, in many suburban and rural areas, where most of the banks failed, government employees moved in and bought up the land cheap from the taxpayers who had gone under. I kid you not.

I also advise reading Thomas Woods Jr.'s new book 33 Questions About American History You're Not Supposed To Ask, which is the follow-on to his previous book, The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History.

Mark Meredith remarks:

Wealthy DC suburbs are not the land of government workers, but of corporate lobbyists and consultants. Nearly every government worker I've known in DC made much more money when he left for the private sector.


Comments

Name

Email

Website

Speak your mind

Archives

Resources & Links

Search