Dec

19

So my fiancé walks by my desk and asks:

“How’s it going?”.
“Well, I am flat for the day” - I answer.
“How about yesterday?” - she continues.
“Flat yesterday too” - I admit.
“Huh?” - she looks baffled.
“You know, the market was really hard yesterday” - I say, pulling up a chart on the screen showing yesterdays action.
“There, look how it traded down from early morning, and then all day. And continued down this morning too” - I add, to be on the safe side that she will understand how difficult it has been.
“See..?” - I say, certain that I have showed the perfect alibi for my bad result.
“But why didn’t you just sell up there, and buy down here?” - she asks unmoved, pointing at the top and bottom on the chart, without revealing any sign that can tell me if she is serious or not.
“Ehhhh…” - I start.
“I mean, isn’t it obvious, if you want to make a profit, that is?” - she continues.
And with that, she smiles at me and starts walking away. “Duh” is all I can muster up as she vanishes around the corner.

G.M. Nigel Davies takes the opposite side:

With candlestick charts I’ve found it useful to do the opposite and have green for down bars and red for up. Lots of green is often a good time to buy (Scott has done selling it short and is about to buy to cover) whilst lots of red ‘can’ be a good time to take profits (provided it doesn’t keep going up of course in which case it’s better to hang in there).

Instead of red and green, black and white is also good, but the important thing is to use different colours to everyone else (white for down bars and black for up). Red and black tend to symbolise blood and death in Western culture and to see them on your screen can be offputting vis a vis pulling the trigger on longs. Better to have colours you find comforting at such moments.


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