Sep

6

 An interesting article with a hint (energy/nutrient flow) of the Dailyspec's recommended book, "The Way Life Works" (Hoagland and Dodson) is this: "Soil's Microbial Market SHows the Ruthless Side of Forests".

It should be noted, however, that interactions seen in a petri dish are not always representative of what happens in a living system– in fact, there are antibiotics that are being revisited because they are much more effective in the complexities of the human body than once thought based on petri dish performance.

The cooperative vs. " cutthroat" views of nature are being tested.

Some quotes follow:

"Toby Kiers, an evolutionary biologist at VU University Amsterdam, finds that the interactions among plants and their fungal symbiotes resemble a cutthroat marketplace in which the species negotiate their exchanges of nutrients ruthlessly."

And

"Based on observations of the free-market system, Kiers suspects that what has stabilized plant-fungal mutualisms for at least 470 million years is not that individual organisms are committed to the good of the community, but rather that, in most cases, both plants and fungi benefit more from trading with each other than from keeping resources to themselves."

Alston Mabry writes: 

One thing I notice is people talking about competition and cooperation as if they are equal concepts on the same level biologically, rather than seeing cooperation as one strategy inside a framework of competition.


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