Aug

11

Jiu Jitsu, from Jim Sogi

August 11, 2019 |

 I've been watching a little UFC fighting by Royce Gracie, of the Brazilian Jiu Jitsu school. It's a grappling form which include strikes. It's used in street fighting as well as in the cage. The main part is defensive. They grapple the opponent to the ground and wrap their legs or arms around the opponent's arms and neck to immobilize them, and prevent the opponent from defeating them, or striking them. When there is an opening due to a mistake by the opponent, then they go for a strangle or arm lock using leverage.

I couldn't help but think of the parallels to trading. In the long run, a defensive strategy is a must, and when there is an opening attack using leverage. Gracie says if you cannot be defeated, then you can win.

Another aspect was time. Rather than engage in exhaustive combat, striking, dancing around, the jiu jitsu guys would get the opponent where they could not hurt them, and not expend a lot of energy. They didn't even have to see where the opponent was. Time would go by in a match where virtually nothing was happening.

Time and and leverage are interrelated. Rather than use leverage, time can compound gains as well as or better than leverage. That's why patience is rewarded. But I can't wait to develop it.

Peter Pinkhasov writes:

What's true in almost all martial arts is that the techniques should be used as a means of last resort in any real combat situation. If you are always fighting exhibition matches in the same weight class, once confronted with a dangerous situation with new variables, vol, aggressors et al one might end up in the care of Rocky. 

Mr. Isomorphisms writes: 

David Mamet wrote an homage to BJJ (apparently he rolls with Ed O'Neill?!) called Red Belt. The hero is an honourable but poor dojo owner who refuses to fight in the ring under fake rules.

Roice Gracie beat significantly larger opponents in the original Ultimate Fighting league, so I think it's pretty clear that for 1-on-1, no friends helping, no weapons, BJJ is the most effective. A former employee who was in very good shape and knew some BJJ was assaulted in San Francisco and needed to cancel his flight and get hospital time. (He was also robbed.) The assailant had a gun (which he used to pistol-whip, not shoot, thankfully), my employee was walking home from a bar, the assailant attacked first, and he was angry.


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