Feb

13

 My apologies for the most recent rant about Grant's being so virtuous on the question of "race". I have (finally) made it to the backstretch with my work of fiction (the two previous attempts pulled up lame without even making the quarter pole) and the horse and I are getting feverish. I do have the excuse of seeing a real parallel with the past through Grant's eyes. For me the present frictions very much mimic the shifts in diplomacy and commercial relations that occurred in the last quarter of the last third of the 19th century. Up until the Spanish American War, the greatest testiness in "international relations" (sic) had been between the U.S. and Britain. Germany, the China of the day, had approved of America and its culture. As the Chinese have become a primary audience for U.S. entertainment, the Germans devoured dime novels and were fascinated by the American West. When Grant went to Europe on his world tour, he found "ordinary" (sic) Germans delightfully democratic compared to the British; and he hoped that, having finally defeated their Napoleonic enemy France, they would have the sense to choose commerce over empire. He did not find Bismarck and the Prussian General Staff to be nearly as clever as they thought they were; but it appeared that Bismarck would be able to get the Kaiser and the generals to see the folly of choosing a war with the Russians, when they could have immensely profitable trade instead. Grant's hopes were disappointed. Instead of building a simple and inexpensive canal in Nicaragua in the 1880s, the U.S. waited a quarter century and built the aquatic equivalent of the space shuttle. The Germans chose empire instead of trade and then managed to turn the British into American allies by choosing Spain over the U.S. in the conflicts over the Caribbean and the Pacific.


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