Jan

30

 David Lillienfeld's marvelous (and sad) piece about Frank Robinson and the O's was a reminder of how much losses count more than wins. Decades later I still have memories in my sleep about pitches missed as a catcher; and I find myself jumping awake to turn and chase the imaginary ball as it skips away towards the boards of the backstop.

anonymous writes: 

I watched a documentary on Larry Bird and Magic Johnson yesterday. Bird mentioned that the losses haunted him years later. Even decades later, he is still haunted by the loss of Indiana State to Michigan State in 1979.

This made me think about my sports career. I, too remember the losses much more than the wins. The biggest one for me, was when I had the chance to win game from the free throw line for the league championship.

We were down by 1 and I got fouled with 1 second to play and went to the line for a 1 and 1 shot. Now, free throws were something that I prided myself on. I was a high 90% shooter. I once made 108 free throws in a row and had 75 and 50 in a row multiples times. Making 25 in a row was nothing to me.

There's a whole story and build up to this moment that I'll share with the group another time, but I can tell you that I went to the free line with supreme confidence that I was going to win that game in heroic fashion. I'll never forget that moment and that shot leaving my hands knowing with 100% certainty that it was going in…and I'll never forget the shocking disbelief when the ball bounced out.

It was a true turning point in my life and taught me a lesson that I have never and will never forget. In hindsight, it's clear to me that that miss and what happened just before and afterwards was one of the greatest things that ever happened to me.

So maybe if I've got some free time, I'll share the whole story with the group if there is an interest in hearing it.

anonymous writes: 

Behavioral finance studies suggest that pain of losses exceeds the joy of equivalent gains. This may help explain why the velocity of declines are often greater than equivalent gains.


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  1. Andre Wallin on February 2, 2019 5:05 am

    This is the problem with trading and poker the eqution of losing feels worse than winning feels good. Where does that leave a mortal?

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