Jan

16

400 free Ivy League university courses you can take online in 2019.

I sometimes explore online courses looking for interesting lecture videos that I can either watch or convert to mp3's and use as podcasts.

Mr. Isomorphisms writes:

Their list doesn't have a couple of my favourites. Aiken's compilers course at Stanford and MIT's xv6 lions commentary on unix.

Recent mathematical finds:

-a locus with 25920 linear transformations by H F Baker (archive.org)

-ikosahedron by Felix Klein (archive.org)

-slodowy: platonic solids, kleinian singularities, and lie groups

-Elie Cartan: theory of spinors (more readable than you might think; written in the autumn of his life)

-Park & Yang: yang-baxter equations. (on arXiv, written for an encyclopedia)

The A-D-E stuff is probably the most interesting mathematics ever found. (Mathematicians get to leverage the enormous and relatively obvious differences between platonic solids to make inferences about other structures.)

I'll say this, MIT OCW (started ~2002, no productivity gains so far) is higher quality than Sam's Teach Yourself C++ at Barnes & Noble.

Competition in general has benefits, but 30 cold medicines yet none of them work is just more confusing things to try. Speaking of cold medicines that don't work and competition/markets, I would contrast Guatemala to the U.S. in this way. Guatemala has genuine markets–small merchants who will negotiate on price–whereas the U.S. has CVS (posted-offer, negotiations behind the scenes by eg Procter & Gamble vis-a-vis CVS). CVS will carry fewer cold medicines but they will work.

Back to education and MOOC's: delivery of a higher-quality product happens online than Barnes & Noble (or public library), with youtube (Federico Ardila), PDF's hosted on someone's site (Andrew Ranicki), or Rails/post-Rails MOOC's. More people know about more stuff because of youtube documentaries; that's already happened. It just won't improve work output, other than–we've yet to see how this pans out–millennials deciding that programming is the only decent career, and that they can teach themselves (including 25-year-olds who have held 1-9 jobs teaching for General Assembly).


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