Jun

12

Here in the bleachers we are entertaining ourselves during the half inning and pitching changes by discussing FX. This has more than a purely academic examination since our handicapping spreadsheet for the U.S. stock market keeps offering ADRs among its "can't lose" picks. The magic formula has us owning positions in companies in Taiwan (TSM), China (NTES, SHI,YY) and Argentina (TGS); companies whose stocks trade in non-U.S. dollar markets are now 20% of the List.

So, for 1 out of every 5 stocks, the "Buy" recommendation involves a double speculation– a long on the companiese individual fortunes and a short on the U.S. dollar.

Keynes hoped that the very question of foreign exchange would disappear, that money would cease to be part of economics by becoming universally invisible. His dream was for all FX clearings to be handled through the Bank for International Settlements - the intermediary first established to receive the German reparations payments that were to be financed by U.S. loans of gold. The reparations were not, in fact, paid, even though Keynes never revised his opinion that the Treaties by which Germany promised to pay them were somehow the main cause of the Great Depression. Those of you fortunate enough to have studied economics in and after college know that this is still the Number 1 explanation for the collapse in domestic and international credit that occurred between 1927 and 1934. In any case, Keynes' dream of the Bancor never came true; on the contrary, clearings between countries remain stubbornly ties to particular national currencies and the money of the European currency bloc aka the Euro.

So, the question remains: which money offers the best chances for relative gain. The smart(er) guys out here in the bleachers think that FX is THE QUESTION. Frontrunner, the most obnoxious of us all (this year he is wearing an Astros cap) - points out that, if you use the world's private currency (gold) as a unit of account, for a Japanese investor the Nikkei is currently selling for the same price being offered in 1978.


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