Sep

14

Harvest, from Kim Zussman

September 14, 2017 |

 Our vines this year produced a much larger crop than anticipated. Maybe 2 tons, including an earlier pick for Rose' fermentation.

This last weekend we did the pick for reds. I hire a crew of experienced Mexican workers to pick the grapes into plastic lugs, and haul them up the hill where I transport them to our shaded sorting area. I did some picking with these boys but they are amazing. 5 guys - each not much more than 5 feet tall. But strong like oxes, and coordinated enough to carry 36# lugs along slippery slopes like I can no longer do. Couldn't ever, for that matter.

I generously tipped each of them and worried a little that they thought I was greater than them.

14 friends and neighbors formed the sorting brigade. In the shade the brigade picked off bird-damaged berries, leaves, etc. This year the grapes were left to ripen more than prior years, and I learned something: Pretty fruit isn't great fruit. Our crop already had many raisins and bird damaged berries. Raisins are ok, and the flavor improvement by waiting for full ripening through incessant bird attacks and heat waves was amazing.

The harvest party and lunch afterwards - featuring our wines - was great. Except for the neighbor who was drunk by 11, and failed in his function of sorting grapes in lieu of chatting up the on site women.

I had anticipated a bigger crop this year, but not this much bigger. As I write this there is 1000L of grape must fermenting in four containers in the garage. Fortunately I was prepared with enough fermenters, but I'm still short an aging tank that is to be shipped from Florida.

Wine making reminds me of my emergency medicine rotations as a resident. You have to think on your feet. No texts to consult, no one to ask. Each and every crisis you have to address to the best of your ability. (The Mrs is not on board as to the amount of work involved in this. But I think it is good for one's 62 year old noodle, to the extent that it forces me to learn and adapt like I was a kid)

The fermenting must is like a beautiful version of the irresolvable mess of humanity. There are thousands of compounds and enzymes going off in every direction, and your job as wine maker is to not destroy beauty and enjoy the ride. This kind of thing attracts controlling people who serendipitously succeed by letting go.

Here's to what California might have been, had the socialist putsch of the past 40+ years not robbed of us our destiny.

Check out the blind taste testing scene in the movie Bottle Shock.

Stefan Jovanovich writes: 

Amen. I first saw California in 1967 on my way to VN and it took me 5 years to get back. Our daughter, who was born and raised there, and her parents now live in permanent exile from what was our near perfect homeland. None of us is ever going back, and we will always mourn for what was destroyed - the common belief that no one in private life had the right to tell anyone else what to think or do.

Kim Zussman writes: 

I have done two Tours of Duty of living in the beauty of California, and I can confirm that the 1960s were very different, especially from a technologists point of view. The joy of creativity has moved to the effects of huge financial emphasis rather than intellectual idealism.

Our natural setting is still very desirable, but the feeling of open spaces has changed into me feeling claustrophobic in freeway traffic, escalating housing and living costs, and government that makes things worse.

But I see even more problems in the world almost everywhere else: Crowded Asia, Corrupt Latin America, poor overpopulated Africa, cold Russia, and dyeing Europe. There are too many people in all the big cities, and not enough for all the people to do. I fear the world will go through bigger problems before society settles on a more peaceful and productive system.


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2 Comments so far

  1. Andre on September 15, 2017 6:44 pm

    I recommend Allen carrs book stop drinking now for anyone who struggles with the addictive poison as I have.

  2. Igor on September 23, 2017 9:08 pm

    Boiling half of must to reduce it by half, mixing everything with 1,5-3% sea water before fermentation helps with surpluses, cheers!

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