Aug

29

 What is the composition of the rainwater dumped by the storm? The eventual source is the ocean, but is the means of getting into rainwater evaporation (in which case it's "fresh water"), or has it simply been sucked up into clouds? If the latter, then it must have significant salt, and therefore be detrimental to crops.

Stefan Jovanovich answers: 

The rain is fresh water; Japan gets half its annual rainfall from typhoons. The salt water comes from storm surges - basically high tides aided by sustained onshore wind; but it is not the source of the flooding. The updrafts in typhoons are so destructive because they push the clouds higher and, when the storm comes against structures, create pressure differentials that can literally blow buildings apart from the inside. That is why, even though it is counter-intuitive, you have to have air vents that can be left open so that the pressures inside and out can equalize. The only "sucking up" of actual sea water is the wave action, but that is caused by the rotational windspeeds, not the updrafts.

As bad as Harvey may seem, Hato's effects will probably be even more damaging.


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