Aug

16

 I'm not unfamiliar with the VC world, and I'm baffled by the size of the filecoin raise. Can anyone provide insight?

Andy Aiken writes:

In effect, Protocal Labs, the company behind Filecoin, has eschewed VC funding and simultaneously made a gambit that selling the coin will stimulate quick adoption of their app.

1) In contrast to other ICOs, Filecoin deliberately designed the ICO to be SEC-compliant, and thus could allow US investors
2) the timing could not be better, with Bitcoin and platform coins such as IOTA near ATHs. It has been hyped in a well-orchestrated marketing campaign.
3) the project/app has immediate practical value, and similar offerings have already been implemented in such projects as Sia and Storj.
4) the coin is the transaction token, and does not represent a share of the company. Think of a Filecoin as a unit of revenue, not as an indication of valuation. Consider Walmart: annual revenues this yearwill be about $500B, while Walmart market cap is <$250B. The relationship between Walmart revenue and market cap depends on other variables, such as operating margin.

I did not participate. My view is that the project will succeed and be profitable, but that the valuation is rich given the established market presence of Sia and Storj, not to mention cloud storage offerings such as AWS. But with AWS or similar cloud storage, a user is not able to generate income from their own unused storage capacity. There is a financial incentive to use apps like Sia, Storj, and Filecoin.

The future value of the coin will depend on adoption. Sia and Storj are not very easy to use. If Filecoin can make their user client easier to use, then it could well deserve the valuation.
 


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  1. Barry Gitarts on August 21, 2017 12:39 pm

    Tokenizing a protocol is such a new concept that valuation is mostly theory at this point.

    IPFS is a new protocol to store data on the internet and filecoin stands to be the incentive structure for IPFS to be used.

    This is an example of a fat protocol, where the majority of value is captured at the protocol layer rather then traditional protocols like http, where the company building the service on top of the protocol captures most of the value ie: Google, Facebook, Twitter, Snap, etc. http://www.usv.com/blog/fat-protocols

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