Jul

30

 Dunkirk the movie is a video game with no characters to speak of and no context to illumine the heroism of the English in defending their Island, the sordid cravenness of the French, and the amazing woeful strategic mistake of the Germans in halting their war effort in an attempt to accept their hoped for surrender from England. Particularly wasteful aside from the 1 1/2 hours of dog fighting with the masked pilot was the remaining 20 minutes showing some tars stuck in an abandoned ship wrestling with the French question. Almost as wasteful was the showing of an abandoned tar shipwrecked by a Uboat taken on board by a yachtsman who promptly kills a rescued because of shell shock. The agrarian nature of the only spoken dialogue downplaying the heroism of the individual and showing moral neutrality between the French, Germans, and British, with no mention at all of Churchill's energizing words to fight the Germans except for a listless Newpaper reading is in keeping with the agrarian nature of the film, and the need to gain good reviews by showing a lack of heroism.

Stefan Jovanovich writes: 

Whatever the French Army was at Dunkirk, they were neither sordid nor craven. Half of them defended the perimeter to allow the escape of the BEF and 100K other French soldiers (those who became the Free French Army that suffered higher casualties after D-Day than any other Allied Army except the Poles). German Panzers halted not because of any strategic mistake but because of internal quarreling between Hitler and the General Staff over whether or not von Rundstedt would have central command authority. When the unit commanders kept ignoring their own Chief of Staff, Hitler called a halt to all operations and demanded that the Army mend its ways. But for the miracle of the English Channel becoming a lake and the Germans discovering that ruined cities built of concrete and steel become perfect tank traps, the delay would have made little difference.


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