Jul

19

It looks to me as though the high is about in here. Maybe a drop of 5-10% over a period of at least a few weeks. All of this in the context of a very powerful bull market that will carry for at least the next 4 or 5 years (with fits and starts, decades) driven by lower rates, lower unemployment and low inflation in a world fast transforming on the energy and transportation arenas.

Anatoly Veltman writes: 

I only glance at the charts, and I see no difference between the 2007 topping action and the current chart juncture. So to me it looks more like agreeing with Ralph about no charting reason to hold Long here, but also not anticipating reasons to look for Long any time soon. What was that about "lower rates"??

Paolo Pezzutti writes:

Charts are useless. Your perception can be biased by what could look like specific formation. I think we should discuss the possibility of a top based on a more scientific and measurable approach. It's been years since we've heard about analogs with past topping formations and distribution patterns. Sooner or later stocks will move to the downside anyway.

anonymous writes: 

If we are in an analogous market to 2007:

Have we had any "warning shots" similar to Feb. 27, 2007 in which the underlying weakness of credit markets began to be evident? Is there reason to suspect that commodities are at bubble levels, or that a commodity bubble may form as in 1H2008, in divergence from the trajectory of earnings growth and equity prices? Are quant funds blowing up, indicating a sudden change in historical relationships between markets?

Ralph Vince writes: 

Giant bull market in bonds for the past 35 years.

I KNOW I'm not smart enough to call the top in that one. There's no great insight on my part, I'm just sticking with the bass line here, and that brings us to a 1 big-handle on the thirty constant mat.

Larry Williams writes:

The bearish Cassandra's on bonds miss the point. The Fed can't raise rates much here in a struggling economy. 2% GDP growth looks like about it based on velocity of money and credit. The Fed has to stop using Phillips Curve model.


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2 Comments so far

  1. Ed on July 19, 2017 8:31 pm

    Does anyone know the current greedymeter reading?

  2. Andrew McCauley on July 20, 2017 2:20 am

    Since 1970, the 3-month interval post July has delivered the largest market declines in terms of average percentage drawdown (July close to the lowest index level in either August, September, or October). In fact the average drawdown for the 3-months post July of -7.78% is significant at the 1 in 20 level when compared with all other 3-month periods.

    The conditional 3-month forward average drawdown, following a record closing level in July, historically delivered a slightly larger drawdown of -8.47%.

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