May

23

 If American Enterprise Institute's numbers are correct and if the Trump Administration is serious about their promise of creating jobs, Trump should immediately give up on coal and focus on solar. Unfortunately, AEI's presentation is wrong.

AEI put their thumb on the solar scale. For solar, they included employees dedicated to the construction and installation of new solar assets in addition to operating employees. They did not do the same for coal. They didn't do it for coal because almost no one is building a new coal plant.

Instead of comparing apples with oranges, AEI compared apples with orange trucks. Nevertheless, on the jobs front, the conclusion is the same: Trump should give up on coal.

Stefan Jovanovich writes: 

When Milton Friedman was shown a construction project in The Third World where the earth moving was done by people using shovels, he was told that this was helping with employment. Friedman is said to have replied: "Then why not take away the shovels and give them trowels." The output for solar remains trivial - .04 billion MWH vs. 1.24 billion for coal and 1.38 billion for natural gas. Even the most optimistic projections of the DOE don't have solar producing even 10% of the present output of either coal or natural gas before 2025. Perhaps the solution to the employment problem is to abolish the long-wall mining equipment and bring back the shovels.

Leo Jia writes: 

It is alive and well here in China. At my building complex on the east side of Shanghai, which was an early 1990s series of lux buildings, they'll send a ground crew of 10 to trim hedges all day. I could have easily done the same with a trimmer in an afternoon during my summer odd jobs.

Other bizarre aspects of town– even in some of the most posh areas with the latest buildings, there are a dirth of street lights and almost none of the bicycles, runners, and electric mopeds, even the newest, have lights and/or reflectors.

Another thing I wince at is workmen of all kinds not using safety glasses which cost all of a couple of USD equivalent. The ones I see wearing are the supervisors well away from the dangers.


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  1. FTR on May 23, 2017 10:09 pm

    I’m not sure what there is to do to be “pro-coal”? Except for removing the CPP, there’s little the administration can do to alter energy policy. FERC can only add pipelines.

    Perhaps the mostly vastly overstated factor in energy policy is the extent to which the president can actually impact it.

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