Mar

20

 The Democrats' success in establishing the first national party in American history was hardly the product of inspired military leadership. Jefferson and Madison's careers as CIC were, to be kind, complete failures; and, by the time the Democrats' genuine war hero (Monroe) became President, the party dominated American politics as thoroughly as Roosevelt's New Deal Democrats did in 1934. But, with opponents like Hamilton, how could the Democrats have failed? No one with even half an ear could fail to hear the absolute contempt that the Federalists had for the Republican notion of popular sovereignty. What is even more striking is how determined they were to ignore what Washington himself had said and done.

When, after the Revolution's success, Henry Knox proposed the establishment of the Society of the Cincinnati, the charter provided that membership would be hereditary, by rule of primogeniture. Washington was invited to become a member and was elected its first President; but, when he learned of the hereditary membership clause, he insisted on resigning. There would be no nobility in the United States of America. To keep Washington as President, the Society revised its charter to eliminate all clauses providing for hereditary membership. After Washington resigned to take on the slightly more important duties of President of the United States, the members reinstated the clauses providing for hereditary membership.


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