Sep

6

One has had pleasure of reading the autobiography of Arizona Frank and if he isn't the spitting reincarnation of Jeff I don't know. He played every scam, known in those days as "gyps" in the book especially the minister horse trade, the race walking trade, the sawing off the trigger scam (a good way to kill someone), three card monte, and many others. He killed many a man without compunction but gave up drinking at 75. Almost all of the gyps are quite comparable to those we see in the market. He had the luxury like Marty Riesman of being the son of a bookie, in this case the most astute horse trader of the plains and he could tell just by sitting on a horse what ailments it had. He liked to buy horses from those trying to cheat him, and he never let them know he knew of their fraud as that raised the price when the fraudster knew he knew. I wish I had 1/10 the knowledge of Arizona Frank regarding frauds as it would have saved me hundreds of millions. So many of those that have defrauded me have used variants of the Gyps that Arizona Frank wrote about.

Here's the start of one of Arizona Frank's best gyps: 

His newspaper ad.

"A Widow Lady…. Will sell at a great sacrifice the cotts of her deceased husband's sporting stable, consisting of the fast, valuable and well known road team orange boy and blossom. Orange boy has traded the mile is 22 1 blossom at 225 and double to pole in 230. They are six year old and perfectly sound, beautiful dark bays and black points, 115 hands. They drive together like one. They will not be sold for turf purposes. Will also dispose of trotting wagons, training cart, fancy blanket and harness. In fact the complete contents of a gentleman's driving stable. Michigan avenue"

The ad proved itself to be as attractive as I had intended, not only in luring prospective buyers for the horses, but also in drawing suitors for the widow lady."

Frank had bought the horse for $25 bucks at the stockyard and dressed up as a minister to shoo away all the potential buyers who wished to use the horses for "turf purposes".


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2 Comments so far

  1. anand on September 12, 2016 11:43 am

    how do you get time to read all these books and monitor the markets (making a note of markets at regular intervals)?

  2. Robert Rybolt on December 29, 2016 5:36 pm

    Frank Tarbox (Tarbeaux)was the son of wealthy real estate man, Horacce Tarbox. Frank was born in Freeport, IL in 1857 and in his teens went to live with his sister, Mary and her husband, Charles A. Moore, in Sidney, Nebr. In 1877 got arrested for operating a Monte scam.

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