Jun

22

 Disclosure: I'm not an expert in this topic. However, I met with my physician. I took the test. The results suggested one critical deficiency. I'm currently on a 12-week prescription of Vitamin D (50,000 IU).

Dylan Distasio writes: 

Based on the fact it's a script and that dose, I am guessing your doc put you on D2 versus D3. Not a biggie, but there is a fair amount of evidence D2 is inferior to D3. D2 needs to be converted by your body to D3. I would recommend just picking up a quality D3 supplement OTC once your script is done. My doc did the same thing as yours when my levels came back low. I don't think your average one is familiar with the nuance.

It's an incredibly important vitamin, the RDAs for it are way too low, and it is one of the few vitamins you are probably not getting near enough of especially during our winters. I don't take a multi but I am taking 12,000IUs of D3 a day divided in two doses. I'm not recommending that as your circumstances may vary.

Carder Dimitroff writes: 

I checked. You are right!

Next visit I'll ask about D3.

Thank you.

Do you have recommendations for sourcing high quality D3? 

Dylan Distasio writes: 

I should add that the best source of D is the sun, and that monitoring blood levels regularly is really the best way to know what is going on (not that I am currently doing so). Regardless of D2 or D3, be sure to take them with some food that has fat in it, as neither is water soluble. In terms of a source, I use Kirkland but a lot have good test results.

anonymous writes: 

Vitamin D follow up from a n of 1…

As mentioned, I had not been monitoring blood levels regularly, but have been religiously taking 4,000 units of D3 a day for a year+ as a conservative dose since I really don't get much sun, and was deficient even by conservative standards on my last physical.

I just got bloods done for a physical tomorrow, and even with 4,000IU a day, I am just barely at the low end of the normal range (>0 ng/mL) at 31 ng/ml.

I should add that through genetic testing, I've discovered I am likely prone to Vitamin D deficiency due to an issue at this SNP rs2282679:

This gene encodes for the vitamin D binding protein which affects the delivery of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (precursor to vitamin D hormone) and activated vitamin D (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D) to target organs, as well as clearance of vitamin D metabolites from the circulation.

This genotype, rs2282679(A;C), is associated with an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency.

It is known that supplementing with 1,000 IU of vitamin D3 per day generally raises serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels by around 5 ng/ml. This may not be the case for people with the affected genotypes, rs2282679(A;C) and rs2282679(C;C), which may require higher vitamin D supplementation doses to achieve the same serum levels as individuals without these polymorphisms.

Blood levels of 25-hyroxyvitamin D below 20 ng/ml are considered deficient, less than 30 ng/ml is inadequate. Individuals with levels between 30-60 ng/ml are considered adequate. Meta-analyses have shown that people with serum levels between 40-60 ng/ml have the lowest all-cause mortality. Regardless of an individuals genotype for this particular SNP, a 25-hydroxy vitamin D blood test available from most health care providers can be useful for providing insight in how to optimize overall vitamin D levels.


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