Mar

13

"Many scientific “truths” are, in fact, false"

In 2005, John Ioannidis, a professor of medicine at Stanford University, published a paper, "Why most published research findings are false," mathematically showing that a huge number of published papers must be incorrect. He also looked at a number of well-regarded medical research findings, and found that, of 34 that had been retested, 41% had been contradicted or found to be significantly exaggerated.

Since then, researchers in several scientific areas have consistently struggled to reproduce major results of prominent studies. By some estimates, at least 51%—and as much as 89%—of published papers are based on studies and experiments showing results that cannot be reproduced.

Bill Rafter writes: 

In academia the currency is published articles. It should therefore not be a surprise that many published articles are useless or worse, flat-out-wrong to the point of being fraudulent. Consider that in the United States the typical number of scientific-based papers published in a peer-reviewed journal by a doctoral candidate is ONE. In certain other countries that number could easily exceed a dozen. Consequently the avid reader of scientific papers learns to discriminate in his reading habits against certain universities and certain countries of origin.

Would you do business with a bank that had a reputation for handing our counterfeit currency? And the fact that counterfeit banknotes exist casts suspicion over all transactions.


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