Sep

23

 In some states, like Oklahoma, there are no emissions inspections. So it would seem like now would be a good time to buy one of these cars on the cheap before the software upgrade and then not do the upgrade (assuming that is, that you don't care about the emissions).

A friend said: "Don't underestimate the seriousness of this.  I am not a lawyer, but isn't triple damages common due to fraud, if proven?"

My answer: Ha! You are assuming that laws actually apply to top corporate executives.

Jordan Low writes: 

I almost purchased a "clean" diesel vehicle. Even if the government is out of the picture, as a consumer I would be outraged. As a consumer, wouldn't you want to return a product that has fraudulent specifications? The liability would already be huge for VW.

Stefan Jovanovich writes:

Read the fine print, people. The car does pass regular emission standards; the software fix was needed so that it could also pass the higher standards that made it eligible for "clean" (sic) energy tax credits. Those were, for a brief period, so ginormous that they would, by themselves, sell the car. That was the incentive for the cheating. 


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